Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein trav­els across Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, the United States, Britain, Greece, and Australia to witness the reality of disaster capitalism. He discovers how companies such as G4S, Serco, and Halliburton cash in on or­ganized misery in a hidden world of privatized detention centers, militarized private security, aid profiteering, and destructive mining.

Disaster has become big business. Talking to immigrants stuck in limbo in Britain or visiting immigration centers in America, Loewenstein maps the secret networks formed to help cor­porations bleed what profits they can from economic crisis. He debates with Western contractors in Afghanistan, meets the locals in post-earthquake Haiti, and in Greece finds a country at the mercy of vulture profiteers. In Papua New Guinea, he sees a local commu­nity forced to rebel against predatory resource companies and NGOs.

What emerges through Loewenstein’s re­porting is a dark history of multinational corpo­rations that, with the aid of media and political elites, have grown more powerful than national governments. In the twenty-first century, the vulnerable have become the world’s most valu­able commodity. Disaster Capitalism is published by Verso in 2015 and in paperback in January 2017.

Profits_of_doom_cover_350Vulture capitalism has seen the corporation become more powerful than the state, and yet its work is often done by stealth, supported by political and media elites. The result is privatised wars and outsourced detention centres, mining companies pillaging precious land in developing countries and struggling nations invaded by NGOs and the corporate dollar. Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein travels to Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea and across Australia to witness the reality of this largely hidden world of privatised detention centres, outsourced aid, destructive resource wars and militarized private security. Who is involved and why? Can it be stopped? What are the alternatives in a globalised world? Profits of Doom, published in 2013 and released in an updated edition in 2014, challenges the fundamentals of our unsustainable way of life and the money-making imperatives driving it. It is released in an updated edition in 2014.
forgodssakecover Four Australian thinkers come together to ask and answer the big questions, such as: What is the nature of the universe? Doesn't religion cause most of the conflict in the world? And Where do we find hope?   We are introduced to different belief systems – Judaism, Christianity, Islam – and to the argument that atheism, like organised religion, has its own compelling logic. And we gain insight into the life events that led each author to their current position.   Jane Caro flirted briefly with spiritual belief, inspired by 19th century literary heroines such as Elizabeth Gaskell and the Bronte sisters. Antony Loewenstein is proudly culturally, yet unconventionally, Jewish. Simon Smart is firmly and resolutely a Christian, but one who has had some of his most profound spiritual moments while surfing. Rachel Woodlock grew up in the alternative embrace of Baha'i belief but became entranced by its older parent religion, Islam.   Provocative, informative and passionately argued, For God's Sakepublished in 2013, encourages us to accept religious differences, but to also challenge more vigorously the beliefs that create discord.  
After Zionism, published in 2012 and 2013 with co-editor Ahmed Moor, brings together some of the world s leading thinkers on the Middle East question to dissect the century-long conflict between Zionism and the Palestinians, and to explore possible forms of a one-state solution. Time has run out for the two-state solution because of the unending and permanent Jewish colonization of Palestinian land. Although deep mistrust exists on both sides of the conflict, growing numbers of Palestinians and Israelis, Jews and Arabs are working together to forge a different, unified future. Progressive and realist ideas are at last gaining a foothold in the discourse, while those influenced by the colonial era have been discredited or abandoned. Whatever the political solution may be, Palestinian and Israeli lives are intertwined, enmeshed, irrevocably. This daring and timely collection includes essays by Omar Barghouti, Jonathan Cook, Joseph Dana, Jeremiah Haber, Jeff Halper, Ghada Karmi, Antony Loewenstein, Saree Makdisi, John Mearsheimer, Ahmed Moor, Ilan Pappe, Sara Roy and Phil Weiss.
The 2008 financial crisis opened the door for a bold, progressive social movement. But despite widespread revulsion at economic inequity and political opportunism, after the crash very little has changed. Has the Left failed? What agenda should progressives pursue? And what alternatives do they dare to imagine? Left Turn, published by Melbourne University Press in 2012 and co-edited with Jeff Sparrow, is aimed at the many Australians disillusioned with the political process. It includes passionate and challenging contributions by a diverse range of writers, thinkers and politicians, from Larissa Berendht and Christos Tsiolkas to Guy Rundle and Lee Rhiannon. These essays offer perspectives largely excluded from the mainstream. They offer possibilities for resistance and for a renewed struggle for change.
The Blogging Revolution, released by Melbourne University Press in 2008, is a colourful and revelatory account of bloggers around the globe why live and write under repressive regimes - many of them risking their lives in doing so. Antony Loewenstein's travels take him to private parties in Iran and Egypt, internet cafes in Saudi Arabia and Damascus, to the homes of Cuban dissidents and into newspaper offices in Beijing, where he discovers the ways in which the internet is threatening the ruld of governments. Through first-hand investigations, he reveals the complicity of Western multinationals in assisting the restriction of information in these countries and how bloggers are leading the charge for change. The blogging revolution is a superb examination about the nature of repression in the twenty-first century and the power of brave individuals to overcome it. It was released in an updated edition in 2011, post the Arab revolutions, and an updated Indian print version in 2011.
The best-selling book on the Israel/Palestine conflict, My Israel Question - on Jewish identity, the Zionist lobby, reporting from Palestine and future Middle East directions - was released by Melbourne University Press in 2006. A new, updated edition was released in 2007 (and reprinted again in 2008). The book was short-listed for the 2007 NSW Premier's Literary Award. Another fully updated, third edition was published in 2009. It was released in all e-book formats in 2011. An updated and translated edition was published in Arabic in 2012.

Put a sock in it

Iran’s President ramps up the rhetoric. Again:

“Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on Thursday expressed doubt that the Holocaust occurred and suggested Israel be moved to Europe.

“‘Some European countries insist on saying that Hitler killed millions of innocent Jews in furnaces and they insist on it to the extent that if anyone proves something contrary to that they condemn that person and throw them in jail,’ IRNA quoted Ahmadinejad as saying.

“‘Although we don’t accept this claim, if we suppose it is true, we ask the Europeans: Is the killing of innocent Jewish people by Hitler the reason for their support to the occupiers of Jerusalem?'”

Ahmadinejad is clearly trying to appeal to a domestic audience and certain elements within the Arab world. His comments are, of course, completely unacceptable and will only increase the pressure on his country.

Perhaps he should get out more.

16 comments ↪
  • Shabadoo

    Hey, let's give these people a NUKE!

  • kei & yuri

    Indeed his racist stupidity is intolerable and visible as soon as we ask if he would put up with Zionist commentators questioning whether any Palestinians were expelled, tortured, killed, or born in the first place. He probably doesn't really care one way or the other, but he knows that by saying this he is killing a dozen people from heart attacks and upsetting many more, which is like the sociopathic Rethugs constantly replaying animations and footage of IX/XI. However, there is a legitimate point this twit is tainting with his deliberate pulse teasing: the argument that Zionism is some kind of cure for bigotry, a penance for European crimes paid for by non-Europeans. We have said for years that in a just world with an honest Zionism and an honorable Germany, Israel would be the Ruhr Valley with a bit opening onto the Mediterannean Sea.

  • neoleftychick

    I have long mainatained that Golda Mier did the world a great injustice by choosing not to use her nukes in 1973. Still, it's not too late in 2005 or 2006 if we really must wait.

  • Antony Loewenstein

    You're long maintained? Jeez, nuked who? Have you looked at the region's geography recently? But, of course, you don't actually know much about the region or its people, yet seem to hate Arabs. Congrats.You're a war-monger and a fool.

  • chasc

    And you, Lowenstein, are a fool. The Iraqi president (and you) should know, by now, that his comments will be received by a broad audience. Try not explaining the inexplicable.

  • chasc

    Make that "Irani" – sorry for the typo

  • Wombat

    Take it easy Chasc, the Iranian president is known for beign all bluster and no balls. His comments were made for domestic consumotion.You thnk they are any more significant than Bush labelling Iraq as part of the axis of evil? After all, in the simplistic and coimmic book wordl of Dubya, evil needs to be irradictaed no?

  • neoleftychick

    addamoI am afraid that your comments are typical of the hypocrisy we have been getting from the Arab muslim males for generations. If, for example, during an election campaign John Howard or George Bush made a speech saying "We should wipe the West Bank and Gaza off the map" or "all those Palestinians should move to the two Paelstinian states that already exist – Jordan and Syria" Would you say "don't worry about it; it's just for 'domestic consumption?'"The excuse "it's just for domestic consumption" has been used time and time and time again by Arab Muslim males who refuse to grow up and look at their societies honestly.I have been reading about the 6 Day War. All the terrorist apologist Arabists spend whole articles and books spitting venom at Israel for winning so impressively. They whinge "oh, but that was just Arab bluster. They didn't mean it. It was just for their local constituents."In other words, the Jewish political leadership and military have some ethical obligation to help the likes of Nasser, Hussein, and Syrian Soviet-stooges flex their "destroy Israel muscles. It seems that the Arab muslim male thinks that he has a right to line all his weaponry along Israel's borders and Israel is obliged to tell her people "oh don't worry about it, it's just those fiesty Arabs, it's all just for 'domestic consumption' no need to worry."What really irks me is that on the one hand we westerners are rebuked for not realising this is all just harmless Arab fun. Yet when we DO identify some trait, attitude, or behaviour as typically Arab, the writs fly, anti-discrimination cases explode, students are abused in seminars for being a "racist" or even worse an "orientalist."Quite frankly, I am starting to see the whole Arab muslim whinge thing for the evil sham that it is. Call me an "orientalist" if you wish, but from now on I shall be calling it as I see it, and not how some cynical fraudulent yuppie Egyptian American academic saw it.Enough is enough already.

  • Antony Loewenstein

    "I am starting to see the whole Arab muslim whinge thing for the evil sham that it is."Good to see where you stand. Again, spent much time in the Middle East ever, let alone time with Arab people?No, didn't think so.

  • psydoc

    Ant, I really don't understand what it is about the Iranian President that got under your nose. It is essentially an extrapolation of what you have been saying for ages.

  • Wombat

    Lefty,Your repeated references to the Arab Muslim male sounds like you battling some serious issues beyond logic debate. The simple fact is that Iran could not do a thing to hurt Israel short of condemning their own country to annihilation.Domestic agenda’s drive almost every aspect of politics in any country, bar none. One need only listen to any one of Bush’s diatribes to realize his messages are always directed at his Red State base. And what’s this ridiculous fantasy about Arab Muslim Males lining up their weaponry along Israel’s borders? You sound like some frustrated toddler playing in a sand pit. There is a huge difference between talking tough and amassing troops on Israel’s border. You’re completely out of touch with reality.It sounds to me that your greatest frustration is that you want a public forum whereby you want to be able to tell Arabs what you really think of them, but have denied such a venue. Sorry, but it goes both ways darl. No one can say boo about Israel in the MSM without committing career suicide.

  • neoleftychick

    addamoMORE excuses. Now, it's Bush, the MSM, The Jew!!!Please.

  • Wombat

    Excuses when it's Arabs. Facts when it's Israel right Lefty?Lay off the cafeen for a while babe.

  • neoleftychick

    addamoThe Israelis have a first world economy, an internationally admired legal system and Supreme Court, countless Nobel Prize winners, a booming tech and entrepreneurial culture. It ahs an enviable welfare state and its Arab Muslim residents have the highest standards of living in the entire Arab Muslim world.It has runs on the boards that it has every right to be prioud of. Hardly excuses hun.

  • Wombat

    Yes Israeli's have a highly admirable legacy, though I suspect that the state of the economy in Israel is misleading given the bttomless well of support it receives from the US.Arab countries are obviously in a sad state, but I thik it's very hard to gauge how bad or good it woudl have been had the West not had their hands in the region, expliting it for centuries. We like to assume that Western influence has been good for the region, but I guess we'll never know.

  • neoleftychick

    addamoActually we DO know. By the middle of the 20th century there living standards would have been even more abysmal. They would have been living in a complete Dark Age and either Hitler, Stalin, the Japanese or the Chinese would have annexed the area. They would have seized all the oil fields sending the mullahs and shieks packing to Siberia, the gas chambers or elsewhere. What Hitler might have done with the locals we can only guess