Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein trav­els across Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, the United States, Britain, Greece, and Australia to witness the reality of disaster capitalism. He discovers how companies such as G4S, Serco, and Halliburton cash in on or­ganized misery in a hidden world of privatized detention centers, militarized private security, aid profiteering, and destructive mining.

Disaster has become big business. Talking to immigrants stuck in limbo in Britain or visiting immigration centers in America, Loewenstein maps the secret networks formed to help cor­porations bleed what profits they can from economic crisis. He debates with Western contractors in Afghanistan, meets the locals in post-earthquake Haiti, and in Greece finds a country at the mercy of vulture profiteers. In Papua New Guinea, he sees a local commu­nity forced to rebel against predatory resource companies and NGOs.

What emerges through Loewenstein’s re­porting is a dark history of multinational corpo­rations that, with the aid of media and political elites, have grown more powerful than national governments. In the twenty-first century, the vulnerable have become the world’s most valu­able commodity. Disaster Capitalism is published by Verso in 2015 and in paperback in January 2017.

Profits_of_doom_cover_350Vulture capitalism has seen the corporation become more powerful than the state, and yet its work is often done by stealth, supported by political and media elites. The result is privatised wars and outsourced detention centres, mining companies pillaging precious land in developing countries and struggling nations invaded by NGOs and the corporate dollar. Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein travels to Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea and across Australia to witness the reality of this largely hidden world of privatised detention centres, outsourced aid, destructive resource wars and militarized private security. Who is involved and why? Can it be stopped? What are the alternatives in a globalised world? Profits of Doom, published in 2013 and released in an updated edition in 2014, challenges the fundamentals of our unsustainable way of life and the money-making imperatives driving it. It is released in an updated edition in 2014.
forgodssakecover Four Australian thinkers come together to ask and answer the big questions, such as: What is the nature of the universe? Doesn't religion cause most of the conflict in the world? And Where do we find hope?   We are introduced to different belief systems – Judaism, Christianity, Islam – and to the argument that atheism, like organised religion, has its own compelling logic. And we gain insight into the life events that led each author to their current position.   Jane Caro flirted briefly with spiritual belief, inspired by 19th century literary heroines such as Elizabeth Gaskell and the Bronte sisters. Antony Loewenstein is proudly culturally, yet unconventionally, Jewish. Simon Smart is firmly and resolutely a Christian, but one who has had some of his most profound spiritual moments while surfing. Rachel Woodlock grew up in the alternative embrace of Baha'i belief but became entranced by its older parent religion, Islam.   Provocative, informative and passionately argued, For God's Sakepublished in 2013, encourages us to accept religious differences, but to also challenge more vigorously the beliefs that create discord.  
After Zionism, published in 2012 and 2013 with co-editor Ahmed Moor, brings together some of the world s leading thinkers on the Middle East question to dissect the century-long conflict between Zionism and the Palestinians, and to explore possible forms of a one-state solution. Time has run out for the two-state solution because of the unending and permanent Jewish colonization of Palestinian land. Although deep mistrust exists on both sides of the conflict, growing numbers of Palestinians and Israelis, Jews and Arabs are working together to forge a different, unified future. Progressive and realist ideas are at last gaining a foothold in the discourse, while those influenced by the colonial era have been discredited or abandoned. Whatever the political solution may be, Palestinian and Israeli lives are intertwined, enmeshed, irrevocably. This daring and timely collection includes essays by Omar Barghouti, Jonathan Cook, Joseph Dana, Jeremiah Haber, Jeff Halper, Ghada Karmi, Antony Loewenstein, Saree Makdisi, John Mearsheimer, Ahmed Moor, Ilan Pappe, Sara Roy and Phil Weiss.
The 2008 financial crisis opened the door for a bold, progressive social movement. But despite widespread revulsion at economic inequity and political opportunism, after the crash very little has changed. Has the Left failed? What agenda should progressives pursue? And what alternatives do they dare to imagine? Left Turn, published by Melbourne University Press in 2012 and co-edited with Jeff Sparrow, is aimed at the many Australians disillusioned with the political process. It includes passionate and challenging contributions by a diverse range of writers, thinkers and politicians, from Larissa Berendht and Christos Tsiolkas to Guy Rundle and Lee Rhiannon. These essays offer perspectives largely excluded from the mainstream. They offer possibilities for resistance and for a renewed struggle for change.
The Blogging Revolution, released by Melbourne University Press in 2008, is a colourful and revelatory account of bloggers around the globe why live and write under repressive regimes - many of them risking their lives in doing so. Antony Loewenstein's travels take him to private parties in Iran and Egypt, internet cafes in Saudi Arabia and Damascus, to the homes of Cuban dissidents and into newspaper offices in Beijing, where he discovers the ways in which the internet is threatening the ruld of governments. Through first-hand investigations, he reveals the complicity of Western multinationals in assisting the restriction of information in these countries and how bloggers are leading the charge for change. The blogging revolution is a superb examination about the nature of repression in the twenty-first century and the power of brave individuals to overcome it. It was released in an updated edition in 2011, post the Arab revolutions, and an updated Indian print version in 2011.
The best-selling book on the Israel/Palestine conflict, My Israel Question - on Jewish identity, the Zionist lobby, reporting from Palestine and future Middle East directions - was released by Melbourne University Press in 2006. A new, updated edition was released in 2007 (and reprinted again in 2008). The book was short-listed for the 2007 NSW Premier's Literary Award. Another fully updated, third edition was published in 2009. It was released in all e-book formats in 2011. An updated and translated edition was published in Arabic in 2012.

Getting full on Israel

Rupert Murdoch and Nicole Kidman, seen above, enjoy a tasty meal in New York. What’s the occasion? Let the “official” News Ltd press release explain:

“News Corporation chairman and chief executive officer, Rupert Murdoch, has received a humanitarian award from the Simon Wiesenthal Centre.

“The Eastern Office of the Centre presents the award annually.

“Mr Murdoch, who attended with his wife, Wendy Deng, received the award at the organisation’s annual dinner at The Waldorf-Astoria in New York on Wednesday.

“Australian Hollywood actor Nicole Kidman presented Mr Murdoch with the Humanitarian Laureate Award in recognition of his contributions to humanitarian causes. The award recognises his exceptional efforts on behalf of tolerance and diversity.”

One has to read another Murdoch publication, Melbourne’s Herald Sun, to discover the real reason behind the award:

“The award recognises Mr Murdoch’s support for Israel. Mr Murdoch thanked ‘his real friend and great sport’ for agreeing to present the award.”

Elites TV goes even further:

“The black-tie crowd was rapt as both the Israeli and U.S. national anthems were played, and speeches were made.

“As usual, our Open All Night team got into the spirit of the evening, focusing on the gleaming diamond ring on Nicole Kidman’s wedding-ring finger. Is it an engagement ring from country singer Keith Urban? Kidman tore into the chicken dinner with gusto, causing everyone to wonder if she’s pregnant.”

Amazingly, the website actually features a rather unflattering picture of Kidman tearing into her dead bird.

But, let’s not be churlish. Murdoch was thanked for his life-long support of the Zionist state, and by implication, its brutal occupation, checkpoints, Jewish-only roads etc. And let’s not forget that supporting the Iraq war was the true mark of a humanitarian. As he said in 2003:

“The greatest thing to come out of this for the world economy, if you could put it that way, would be $20 a barrel for oil. That’s bigger than any tax cut in any country.”

19 comments ↪
  • Shabadoo

    Ah, after Murdoch and News Ltd again? Why don't you go commit a little journalism again and lob a call into Janet Fife-Yeomans for comment? After all, there's no one around to fire you for sandbagging her quotes this time…

  • Polywise

    ttzxShabadoo, your obsession with Ant is becoming really quite disturbing, not to mention, sad. What, are you glued to his blog all day, waiting with baited breath for him to post something just so you can respond?

  • Wombat

    Hey Shab,You never answered my question abtou whther you considered yourself a Republican. What's the verdict?

  • Shabadoo

    Hi Addamo:Thanks, sorry, contrary to what some people think (see above) I do have a rich full life beyond my barrel-fishing around here. I'm not a Republican, in either the Australian or contemporary American senses of the word (though it's inevitable here); my politics are pretty classically liberal, and so my ancient sympathies are Aristotlian, and in more modern times I think JS Mill's "On Liberty" is a pretty good roadmap. Very round-about answer, but hope it helps. I'd call myself a libertarian, but there are just too many freaks in that department. Polywise, I see only 'progressives' are allowed to play journalistic inside baseball…very telling. But don't flatter yourself, no one is stalking your man.

  • Wombat

    Well Shab,hansk for the reply. Guess what? I consider myself a libertarian also. I'm stil puzzled why you got so offended at my Repug comment?

  • Shabadoo

    Oh, it wasn't so much that I was offended, just that I thought it was beneath you…it's the sort of thoughtless crap that gets slung around over at Kos and the like. My point was that I tend to turn off from arguments when that sort of thing comes out.

  • Wilbourne

    So it's no longer Israel in Antony's own words. It's become the Zionist state. We already know he thinks Zionism is an immoral and unjustifiable concept. And as such, so is Israel – the Zionist state. About time you stopped beating around the bush and said what you truly believed, Israel has no right to exist.My reasoning is correct is it not? If Zionism is wrong, then so too becomes the Zionist state as you called Israel.Please outline your problem with the Simon Wiesenthal Centre, and why then it is an outrage that Murdoch attends a function of theres. Come on Antony, answer a question I pose to you for once, you just posted a few days ago about free and healthy debate.

  • Antony Loewenstein

    I don't believe in a Jewish, Zionist state. It's pretty simple really, said it numerous times before. I support the right of Jews to live there, along with Palestinians. A one-state solution is the ideal, but a two-state more likely in the near future.As for the Wiesenthal Centre, no better or worse than most Zionist groups, defending every Israeli crime like they own the place. Read Finkelstein's Holocaust Industry for much more on this.

  • Wilbourne

    I've read all Finkelstein has to offer, I doubt he affected me as with you.I have some unrelated questions if you would indulge me. Answer at your discretion of course.Is say, Peretz, a Zionist in your eyes?If there is a state of Palestine on the majority of the West Bank, with equal territorial exchange for the large settlements close to the green line, would you cease to be so belligerent towards Israel?Is the Islamic Republic of Iran justified in mandating by law their Islamic identity?Why do you think there is no concerted effort by people such as those in the International Solidarity Movement to form a international solidarity movement in defence of Sudanese animists and Christians that have been oppressed for decades at the hands of the Sudanese government and also wish for a state of their own?Do you think a concerted campaign of attacks on civilian targets in the West (terrorism, if you will), used to highlight the oppression of their people would be justified as the Sudanese non-Muslims have no other means to fight their oppressors?Why is it that when George Bush comes to Australia there are massive protests, but when the Chinese President Hu Jintao arrives there are no protests in support of the long oppressed Tibetans? Why does Bob Brown shout down George Bush, but gush all over Hu Jintao?What is your postion on Hamas, and their charter, leading the PA after the upcoming elections? What of their 'resistance' against civilian targets?Thanks for your time.

  • Antony Loewenstein

    Sorry dude, truly no time to answer all these.My book covers much of it, and it's out in a few months.

  • Wilbourne

    No problem, just curious.

  • Wombat

    Wilbourne,I don’t know if you’re interested in what I have to say, but if you would indulge me, I have some ideas about these qeusrions:“If there is a state of Palestine on the majority of the West Bank, with equal territorial exchange for the large settlements close to the green line, would you cease to be so belligerent towards Israel?”That’s what we in the blogosphere call a loaded question. Belligerence implies irrationality. What is so irrational about championing the cause of a displaced population?If the land that belongs to the Palestinians is handed back to them and th3ey are left alone, then the case will be closed. ”Is the Islamic Republic of Iran justified in mandating by law their Islamic identity?”I don’t believe so, but let’s look at recent history. Iran used to be an open and progressive democracy until the US overthrew their democratically elected leaders and installed a dictator. Mossadegh was stupid enough to think that Iran could keep their oil revenues and use them to benefit the Iranian people. The Shah was in turn, overthrown and a massive distrust of the West was established. The US has only themselves to blame for radicalizing Iran.”Why do you think there is no concerted effort by people such as those in the International Solidarity Movement to form a international solidarity movement in defence of Sudanese animists and Christians that have been oppressed for decades at the hands of the Sudanese government and also wish for a state of their own?”Good question. Just a guess here – there is probably no moral justification for this other than the fact that there is no dispute of territory, and no outside interference contributing to the conflict. Sovereignty is a tricky issue.”Do you think a concerted campaign of attacks on civilian targets in the West (terrorism, if you will), used to highlight the oppression of their people would be justified as the Sudanese non-Muslims have no other means to fight their oppressors?”Attacking the West would only be of benefit if the US was complicit in assisting or enabling the Sudanese leadership in oppressing the non-Muslims. Do you have evidence that this is taking place? Bin Landen tells us there is a good reason why does not attack Sweden.”Why is it that when George Bush comes to Australia there are massive protests, but when the Chinese President Hu Jintao arrives there are no protests in support of the long oppressed Tibetans? Why does Bob Brown shout down George Bush, but gush all over Hu Jintao?”That’s an easy one. George Bush comes to Australia pretending to be the leader of the free world, champion of human rights and bringer of democracy. Many believe the US once stood for these values but has shelved them in favour of US hegemony and big money interests. The anger people have towards the US is that it knows better.China has never pretended to be any of these things. China has a history of being oppressed and humiliated by external forces, which has instilled a distrust of the foreign states. The attitude most people share is that opening China up (practically and ideologically) is the only way to affect human rights in that country. Finally, the spiritual leader of Tibet, has stated repeatedly that he is not opposed to Tibet becoming part of China, in fact that he believed it may in the best interest of Tibet to be integrated.It’s not an excuse, but it does shed come perspective.“What is your postion on Hamas, and their charter, leading the PA after the upcoming elections? What of their 'resistance' against civilian targets?”This is a sensitive issue but potentially significant. I believe that by entering mainstream politics, Hamas will be forced to become more moderate in order to succeed and increase it’s appeal. Just recently, there was a report that Hamas had stated that they are changing their charter to recognize Israel.

  • Darp

    Hmmmm…I somehow can't imagine Uncle Rupert working the two way radio on an FDB recce mission to pin down a group of neo-Nazis who were planning to do over a Synagogue.Where's MY bloody award handed to me by Nicole Kidman?

  • James Waterton

    "picture of Kidman tearing into her dead bird."What a philistine! Whereas the culturally well-adjusted blog administrator would only be seen eating live bird.

  • Clumsy Birds

    Murdoch was thanked for his life-long support of the Zionist state, and by implication, its brutal occupation, checkpoints, Jewish-only roads etc.Hmmm, try: And by implication, his support for the only gay rights parade in the Middle East, set in Jerusalem of all cities, inter alia.That’s a pretty crappy picture of Nicole by the way. Really that desperate to point out the fact than an actress eats? No need to get all snotty, I'm sure whatever it was, was free-range.

  • Edward Mariyani-Squi

    Shabadoo said… "my politics are pretty classically liberal, and so my ancient sympathies are Aristotlian, and in more modern times I think JS Mill's "On Liberty" is a pretty good roadmap."Shabadoo, I don't understand the "and so" in the above statement. Putting "classical liberal" and John S. Mill together makes perfect sense, but throwing in Aristotle seems a bit weird.Just wondering how The Big A fits in, that's all.Regards.

  • Ibrahamav

    Addamo_01 said… If the land that belongs to the Palestinians is handed back to them and th3ey are left alone, then the case will be closed. ******************************At least we now know that the irradication of Israel is to goal. What could possibly be irrational about that?

  • Wombat

    Ibrahamav said…"At least we now know that the irradication of Israel is to goal."I don't follow. We are talking about occupies territories aren't we?

  • Ibrahamav

    Not to the palestinians who consider all of Israel to be occupied territory. But you knew that.