Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein trav­els across Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, the United States, Britain, Greece, and Australia to witness the reality of disaster capitalism. He discovers how companies such as G4S, Serco, and Halliburton cash in on or­ganized misery in a hidden world of privatized detention centers, militarized private security, aid profiteering, and destructive mining.

Disaster has become big business. Talking to immigrants stuck in limbo in Britain or visiting immigration centers in America, Loewenstein maps the secret networks formed to help cor­porations bleed what profits they can from economic crisis. He debates with Western contractors in Afghanistan, meets the locals in post-earthquake Haiti, and in Greece finds a country at the mercy of vulture profiteers. In Papua New Guinea, he sees a local commu­nity forced to rebel against predatory resource companies and NGOs.

What emerges through Loewenstein’s re­porting is a dark history of multinational corpo­rations that, with the aid of media and political elites, have grown more powerful than national governments. In the twenty-first century, the vulnerable have become the world’s most valu­able commodity. Disaster Capitalism is published by Verso in 2015 and in paperback in January 2017.

Profits_of_doom_cover_350Vulture capitalism has seen the corporation become more powerful than the state, and yet its work is often done by stealth, supported by political and media elites. The result is privatised wars and outsourced detention centres, mining companies pillaging precious land in developing countries and struggling nations invaded by NGOs and the corporate dollar. Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein travels to Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea and across Australia to witness the reality of this largely hidden world of privatised detention centres, outsourced aid, destructive resource wars and militarized private security. Who is involved and why? Can it be stopped? What are the alternatives in a globalised world? Profits of Doom, published in 2013 and released in an updated edition in 2014, challenges the fundamentals of our unsustainable way of life and the money-making imperatives driving it. It is released in an updated edition in 2014.
forgodssakecover Four Australian thinkers come together to ask and answer the big questions, such as: What is the nature of the universe? Doesn't religion cause most of the conflict in the world? And Where do we find hope?   We are introduced to different belief systems – Judaism, Christianity, Islam – and to the argument that atheism, like organised religion, has its own compelling logic. And we gain insight into the life events that led each author to their current position.   Jane Caro flirted briefly with spiritual belief, inspired by 19th century literary heroines such as Elizabeth Gaskell and the Bronte sisters. Antony Loewenstein is proudly culturally, yet unconventionally, Jewish. Simon Smart is firmly and resolutely a Christian, but one who has had some of his most profound spiritual moments while surfing. Rachel Woodlock grew up in the alternative embrace of Baha'i belief but became entranced by its older parent religion, Islam.   Provocative, informative and passionately argued, For God's Sakepublished in 2013, encourages us to accept religious differences, but to also challenge more vigorously the beliefs that create discord.  
After Zionism, published in 2012 and 2013 with co-editor Ahmed Moor, brings together some of the world s leading thinkers on the Middle East question to dissect the century-long conflict between Zionism and the Palestinians, and to explore possible forms of a one-state solution. Time has run out for the two-state solution because of the unending and permanent Jewish colonization of Palestinian land. Although deep mistrust exists on both sides of the conflict, growing numbers of Palestinians and Israelis, Jews and Arabs are working together to forge a different, unified future. Progressive and realist ideas are at last gaining a foothold in the discourse, while those influenced by the colonial era have been discredited or abandoned. Whatever the political solution may be, Palestinian and Israeli lives are intertwined, enmeshed, irrevocably. This daring and timely collection includes essays by Omar Barghouti, Jonathan Cook, Joseph Dana, Jeremiah Haber, Jeff Halper, Ghada Karmi, Antony Loewenstein, Saree Makdisi, John Mearsheimer, Ahmed Moor, Ilan Pappe, Sara Roy and Phil Weiss.
The 2008 financial crisis opened the door for a bold, progressive social movement. But despite widespread revulsion at economic inequity and political opportunism, after the crash very little has changed. Has the Left failed? What agenda should progressives pursue? And what alternatives do they dare to imagine? Left Turn, published by Melbourne University Press in 2012 and co-edited with Jeff Sparrow, is aimed at the many Australians disillusioned with the political process. It includes passionate and challenging contributions by a diverse range of writers, thinkers and politicians, from Larissa Berendht and Christos Tsiolkas to Guy Rundle and Lee Rhiannon. These essays offer perspectives largely excluded from the mainstream. They offer possibilities for resistance and for a renewed struggle for change.
The Blogging Revolution, released by Melbourne University Press in 2008, is a colourful and revelatory account of bloggers around the globe why live and write under repressive regimes - many of them risking their lives in doing so. Antony Loewenstein's travels take him to private parties in Iran and Egypt, internet cafes in Saudi Arabia and Damascus, to the homes of Cuban dissidents and into newspaper offices in Beijing, where he discovers the ways in which the internet is threatening the ruld of governments. Through first-hand investigations, he reveals the complicity of Western multinationals in assisting the restriction of information in these countries and how bloggers are leading the charge for change. The blogging revolution is a superb examination about the nature of repression in the twenty-first century and the power of brave individuals to overcome it. It was released in an updated edition in 2011, post the Arab revolutions, and an updated Indian print version in 2011.
The best-selling book on the Israel/Palestine conflict, My Israel Question - on Jewish identity, the Zionist lobby, reporting from Palestine and future Middle East directions - was released by Melbourne University Press in 2006. A new, updated edition was released in 2007 (and reprinted again in 2008). The book was short-listed for the 2007 NSW Premier's Literary Award. Another fully updated, third edition was published in 2009. It was released in all e-book formats in 2011. An updated and translated edition was published in Arabic in 2012.

Looking over the precipice

Shirin Ebadi, a human rights advocate, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize and Muhammad Sahimi is a professor of chemical engineering at USC. Writing in the LA Times, they articulate the Western challenge, and responsibility, for Iran’s nuclear program:

“The U.S. will not solve the nuclear problem by threatening military strikes or by dragging Iran before the U.N. Security Council. Although a vast majority of Iranians despise the country’s hard-liners and wish for their downfall, they also support its nuclear program because it has become a source of pride for an old nation with a glorious history.

“A military attack would only inflame nationalist sentiments. Iran is not Iraq. Given Iranians’ fierce nationalism and the Shiites’ tradition of martyrdom, any military move would provoke a response that would engulf the entire region, resulting in countless deaths and a ruined economy not only for the region but for the world.

” Iran is at least six to 10 years away from a nuclear bomb, by most estimates. The crisis is not even a crisis. There is ample time for political reform before Iran ever develops the bomb. Meanwhile, the West should permit Iran a limited uranium enrichment program (as allowed under the non-proliferation treaty) under strict safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency – but only when Tehran undertakes meaningful reforms, including freeing political prisoners and holding free and fair elections.

“Lastly, the U.S. and Iran should enter direct negotiations. It is simply absurd for the U.S. and the most important nation in the Middle East not to communicate directly. The Bush administration should not be seduced by exile groups with no support in Iran. Developing democracy is an internal affair.

“Democracy, in the end, will provide the ultimate safeguard against nuclear disaster, because a truly democratic Iran, backed by a majority of Iranians, would feel secure enough not to pursue dangerous military adventures.”

Such words are likely to fall on deaf ears in some circles, but common sense must prevail.

12 comments ↪
  • psydoc

    Of course we should accept these comments beyond what we know to be true. Iran has an active system of proxy terrorism. Iran has been dishonest about its nuclear ambitions and program. Iran has openly declared a desire to eradicate its neighbour.At this stage of the game, one would wonder who is making the estimates of 6-10 years for a nuclear bomb? Such flipant and reckless comments are likely to fall on deaf ears of extreme leftists who bend over forwards to accomodate Islamic facists.Crisis? What crisis?

  • Wombat

    psydoc said…"Iran has an active system of proxy terrorism."So does the US."Iran has been dishonest about its nuclear ambitions and program. Iran has openly declared a desire to eradicate its neighbour."Wrong. Iran contravened the NPT 2 years ago and cince has bent over backwards to not only comply, but show good faith."At this stage of the game, one would wonder who is making the estimates of 6-10 years for a nuclear bomb?"Experts my friend. You are clearly not one of them."Such flipant and reckless comments are likely to fall on deaf ears of extreme leftists who bend over forwards to accomodate Islamic facists."Well, all of your assumptinos are completely off base, so it seems safe to say the same abotu this broad brush stroke ad hominem."Crisis? What crisis?"I sotrngly recommend you do some research. The US is now warnign Iran not to build a gas pipline to Iran. Why the hell woudl they do that, and what business is it of theirs anyway?This crisis has nothignto do with nukes. It;s been barely 3 years and peopl like yourself are falling for the same WMD BS that got us into an illegal and inecessary war.ADD has become an epidemic.I'll leave you with this quote:"Of course the people don't want war. But after all, it's the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it's always a simple matter to drag the people along whether it's a democracy, a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to greater danger." — Herman Goering at the Nuremberg trials

  • Ibrahamav

    It is not surprising that _01 excuses the entire UN alarms about Iran with a quote from a leading Nazi.

  • Wombat

    Ibrahamav said…"It is not surprising that _01 excuses the entire UN alarms about Iran with a quote from a leading Nazi."And isn't it interesting how history continuees to repeat itself?China, Pakistan, and Russia don't seem too alarmed about anything. They know this whole fuss has nothgin to do with nukes. After all, there is zero evidence of it.

  • psydoc

    Adam your series of non sequiter statements make a cogent discussion impossible.

  • violet

    Iran is at least six to 10 years away from a nuclear bomb, by most estimates. The crisis is not even a crisis. There is ample time for political reform before Iran ever develops the bomb.Antony, why are you posting such silliness. This is a serious subject. "Iran has secretly extended the uranium enrichment plant at the centre of the international controversy over its resumption of banned nuclear research earlier this month, satellite imagery has revealed.Seven buildings have been erected around the concealed centrifuges which Western governments fear will be used to manufacture weapons-grade uranium at the Natanz site, 200 miles south of Teheran."

  • Wombat

    psydoc said…"Adam your series of non sequiter statements make a cogent discussion impossible."You should learn to what these words means before cutting and pasting them out of context. If you have somethign to say, bring it on.

  • Wombat

    Incidently I just re-read your oringianl post and it was a perfect example of non sequiter statements and outright lies.

  • psydoc

    addamo_01 when you engage in emotional polemics, your syntax, cogency and spelling all deteriorate. You clearly have strong views, but its a pity that you are so ill tempered and intolerant.I have no interest in your views, but consider it amusing that you are at such odds with all of the leaders and governments of the free world and instead show a bizzare allegiance to a country that has no freedom of speech, no freedom of association and is outrightly intolerant of Jews, gays, its neighbours, other Muslims and the free world. And perhaps, given that you seem to be an expert on everything and are quite ready to denigrate others in their comments, you could share with us how you arrived at your unshakable world-view. Did someone not tell you that Green Left Weekly is good to start up a barbeque but about nothing else. You should find something else to read whilst you are looking for work.

  • Wombat

    Psydoc Yes you’re right Psydoc, my typing is Appling. Forgive me.“You clearly have strong views, but its a pity that you are so ill tempered and intolerant.”I get that way when I hear absolute untruths and factual aberrations. You are digesting absolute rubbish fro the mainstraem media and repeating it verbatim. In this ay and age, ther is no excuse for such ignorance.”I have no interest in your views, but consider it amusing that you are at such odds with all of the leaders and governments of the free world and instead show a bizzare allegiance to a country that has no freedom of speech, no freedom of association and is outrightly intolerant of Jews, gays, its neighbours, other Muslims and the free world.”“Freedom of speech, no freedom of association and is out rightly intolerant of Jews, gays, its neighbors, other Muslims and the free world” have nothing to do with facts Psydoc.The leaders of the free world want to se Iran punished for something it its not doing. When countries are referred by the IAEA to the UNSC, it is because of evidence or breaching the NPT. In this case, the argument is being made without any evidence, but purely for political reasons. They are using inflammatory rhetoric about nuclear weapons to mask their political agenda. That makes it a fraud.I am not allying myself with anyone or anything. I just want to avoid bloodshed on a massive scale. You seem oblivious to what’s at stake, choosing to focus on some romantic notion that “the Jews are in danger”. In spite of al the evils you are dredging up, this is no reason to attack a country and start war that could escalate to horrific proportions.Consult people who know anything about nuclear weapons and proliferation and you will get the same answer as I’ve give you,”And perhaps, given that you seem to be an expert on everything and are quite ready to denigrate others in their comments, you could share with us how you arrived at your unshakable world-view.”I worked in the nuclear industry for 5 years as nuclear engineer. I prepared reports for the IAEA. I made trips to Geneva and attended other conventions and conferences regarding the nuclear engineer. That enough for you?“Did someone not tell you that Green Left Weekly is good to start up a barbeque but about nothing else. You should find something else to read whilst you are looking for work.”I am happily employed thank you very much. And yes, I do know what I’m talking about.

  • psydoc

    "In spite of al the evils you are dredging up, this is no reason to attack a country and start war that could escalate to horrific proportions."At last you have used the right word: evil. Iran is an evil society and I am pleased you can agree. And this is the very centre of the problem: nuclear weapons in the hands of an evil empire should never be tolerated. I am still waiting for you to cite the credible people (other than yourself of course) that have put Iran's nuclear weapon production at 6-10 years.

  • Looks like this is my next mobile device purchase. I had an omnia 7 paid and preordered now Im getting this. Hopefully sony learnt from the x10 mistake and dont screw this one up.