Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein trav­els across Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, the United States, Britain, Greece, and Australia to witness the reality of disaster capitalism. He discovers how companies such as G4S, Serco, and Halliburton cash in on or­ganized misery in a hidden world of privatized detention centers, militarized private security, aid profiteering, and destructive mining.

Disaster has become big business. Talking to immigrants stuck in limbo in Britain or visiting immigration centers in America, Loewenstein maps the secret networks formed to help cor­porations bleed what profits they can from economic crisis. He debates with Western contractors in Afghanistan, meets the locals in post-earthquake Haiti, and in Greece finds a country at the mercy of vulture profiteers. In Papua New Guinea, he sees a local commu­nity forced to rebel against predatory resource companies and NGOs.

What emerges through Loewenstein’s re­porting is a dark history of multinational corpo­rations that, with the aid of media and political elites, have grown more powerful than national governments. In the twenty-first century, the vulnerable have become the world’s most valu­able commodity. Disaster Capitalism is published by Verso in 2015 and in paperback in January 2017.

Profits_of_doom_cover_350Vulture capitalism has seen the corporation become more powerful than the state, and yet its work is often done by stealth, supported by political and media elites. The result is privatised wars and outsourced detention centres, mining companies pillaging precious land in developing countries and struggling nations invaded by NGOs and the corporate dollar. Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein travels to Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea and across Australia to witness the reality of this largely hidden world of privatised detention centres, outsourced aid, destructive resource wars and militarized private security. Who is involved and why? Can it be stopped? What are the alternatives in a globalised world? Profits of Doom, published in 2013 and released in an updated edition in 2014, challenges the fundamentals of our unsustainable way of life and the money-making imperatives driving it. It is released in an updated edition in 2014.
forgodssakecover Four Australian thinkers come together to ask and answer the big questions, such as: What is the nature of the universe? Doesn't religion cause most of the conflict in the world? And Where do we find hope?   We are introduced to different belief systems – Judaism, Christianity, Islam – and to the argument that atheism, like organised religion, has its own compelling logic. And we gain insight into the life events that led each author to their current position.   Jane Caro flirted briefly with spiritual belief, inspired by 19th century literary heroines such as Elizabeth Gaskell and the Bronte sisters. Antony Loewenstein is proudly culturally, yet unconventionally, Jewish. Simon Smart is firmly and resolutely a Christian, but one who has had some of his most profound spiritual moments while surfing. Rachel Woodlock grew up in the alternative embrace of Baha'i belief but became entranced by its older parent religion, Islam.   Provocative, informative and passionately argued, For God's Sakepublished in 2013, encourages us to accept religious differences, but to also challenge more vigorously the beliefs that create discord.  
After Zionism, published in 2012 and 2013 with co-editor Ahmed Moor, brings together some of the world s leading thinkers on the Middle East question to dissect the century-long conflict between Zionism and the Palestinians, and to explore possible forms of a one-state solution. Time has run out for the two-state solution because of the unending and permanent Jewish colonization of Palestinian land. Although deep mistrust exists on both sides of the conflict, growing numbers of Palestinians and Israelis, Jews and Arabs are working together to forge a different, unified future. Progressive and realist ideas are at last gaining a foothold in the discourse, while those influenced by the colonial era have been discredited or abandoned. Whatever the political solution may be, Palestinian and Israeli lives are intertwined, enmeshed, irrevocably. This daring and timely collection includes essays by Omar Barghouti, Jonathan Cook, Joseph Dana, Jeremiah Haber, Jeff Halper, Ghada Karmi, Antony Loewenstein, Saree Makdisi, John Mearsheimer, Ahmed Moor, Ilan Pappe, Sara Roy and Phil Weiss.
The 2008 financial crisis opened the door for a bold, progressive social movement. But despite widespread revulsion at economic inequity and political opportunism, after the crash very little has changed. Has the Left failed? What agenda should progressives pursue? And what alternatives do they dare to imagine? Left Turn, published by Melbourne University Press in 2012 and co-edited with Jeff Sparrow, is aimed at the many Australians disillusioned with the political process. It includes passionate and challenging contributions by a diverse range of writers, thinkers and politicians, from Larissa Berendht and Christos Tsiolkas to Guy Rundle and Lee Rhiannon. These essays offer perspectives largely excluded from the mainstream. They offer possibilities for resistance and for a renewed struggle for change.
The Blogging Revolution, released by Melbourne University Press in 2008, is a colourful and revelatory account of bloggers around the globe why live and write under repressive regimes - many of them risking their lives in doing so. Antony Loewenstein's travels take him to private parties in Iran and Egypt, internet cafes in Saudi Arabia and Damascus, to the homes of Cuban dissidents and into newspaper offices in Beijing, where he discovers the ways in which the internet is threatening the ruld of governments. Through first-hand investigations, he reveals the complicity of Western multinationals in assisting the restriction of information in these countries and how bloggers are leading the charge for change. The blogging revolution is a superb examination about the nature of repression in the twenty-first century and the power of brave individuals to overcome it. It was released in an updated edition in 2011, post the Arab revolutions, and an updated Indian print version in 2011.
The best-selling book on the Israel/Palestine conflict, My Israel Question - on Jewish identity, the Zionist lobby, reporting from Palestine and future Middle East directions - was released by Melbourne University Press in 2006. A new, updated edition was released in 2007 (and reprinted again in 2008). The book was short-listed for the 2007 NSW Premier's Literary Award. Another fully updated, third edition was published in 2009. It was released in all e-book formats in 2011. An updated and translated edition was published in Arabic in 2012.

News bytes

The Independent, November 22:

“Iraqis face the dire prospect of losing up to $200bn (£116bn) of the wealth of their country if an American-inspired plan to hand over development of its oil reserves to US and British multinationals comes into force next year. A report produced by American and British pressure groups warns Iraq will be caught in an “old colonial trap” if it allows foreign companies to take a share of its vast energy reserves. The report is certain to reawaken fears that the real purpose of the 2003 war on Iraq was to ensure its oil came under Western control.”

– Murdoch’s Australian thinks Ariel Sharon is a “dove” and a “strong voice for peace.” Shame about that pesky occupation and the building of even more settlements on occupied Palestinian land.

– Blogger Joshua Marshall @ Talking Points Memo is hiring two journalists. The rise of the blogs continues.

– Colin Powell’s former chief of staff expands on the “cabal” that led the US into Iraq and America’s tattered reputation.

– The Guardian reports on a book discussing that lover of freedom and democracy, Maggie Thatcher:

“Margaret Thatcher forced Francois Mitterrand to give her the codes to disable Argentina’s deadly French-made missiles during the Falklands war by threatening to launch a nuclear warhead against Buenos Aires, according to a book.”

Russ Baker on Bob Woodward:

“…The very definition of an “investigative reporter,” as Woodward is labelled these days ad nauseum, is a pretty elastic one. Meeting a source in a parking garage as a way of identifying abuses and high crimes by powerful insiders is one thing. Dining off that for the next three decades while chumming it up with well-placed insiders for their ‘exclusive accounts’ is another.”

– Tim Dunlop @ Road to Surfdom wonders if Dick Cheney understands what his little liberation flourish in Iraq has created.

23 comments ↪
  • Shabadoo

    God, I still get wood when I think about Maggie. That's a great story.They really should put Iraqi oil in some sort of trust, like they do in Alaska, and give everyone a cut.

  • smiths

    hey shab, just to continue the white phosphorous thing i genuinely suggest you read thishttp://www.commondreams.org/views05/1122-31.htmthe writer george monbiot is a lefty yes,he is also a man who meticulously researches everything he writes on and includes sources for every claim he makes

  • Wombat

    And so the official looting of Iraq's oil begins.What a joke. The war supporters have officially lost their last claim to righteouness.

  • Ibrahamav

    So glad to see you approved of Saddam looting Iraq's oil wealth.Morality does not require altruism.

  • Antony Loewenstein

    So your beloved war has merely replaced one tyrant with Western multinationals.You must be so pleased…

  • leftvegdrunk

    Ibrahamav: "Morality does not require altruism."What does that even mean?

  • orang

    Nooooooo. It's not about the oil. Isn't Monbiot the reason for "Moonbats"?

  • uphillsprinter

    "So glad to see you approved of Saddam looting Iraq's oil wealth."You are awfully presumptuous friend; I don’t think he is condoning Saddam’s looting. Do you ever actually consider or read what people post or do you just take sides and wait for your turn to “post at” as a response. And for your "Morality does not require altruism."So what you are trying to say is that the bush administration has the moral authority of dropping a15000 pound bomb (a bomb so heavy that is does not need to explode) in a crowded city based on “intel” that Saddam might be in the vicinity. Never mind the INNOCENT civilians. Nooo I don’t think that captures the lack of altruism component. I think the better analogy is that Invading, occupying, looting and TORTURING all for the sole intention of re establishing economic and global hegemony is MORALLY justified because of the consequence of removing a ‘client’ dictator gone bad. I think dirtbikeoption, is what our friend is trying to sayOh sooo SCAMPISH!!!!

  • Ibrahamav

    It appears that you are not thinking to well. But your feeble attempt is applauded. There was and is no intent by the American party to loot and torture. Neither was there an attempt, via the Gulf War, to establish a global hegemony. The US removed a murderous threat to the region. But they didn't realize what the people were actually like. Oh well.

  • Ibrahamav

    They didn't realize how pissed of the minority sunni's would be once they lost their right to rule the Shi'ites and Kurds.Let alone face their wrath after years of torture and looting.

  • orang

    …..The US removed a murderous threat to the region. But they didn't realize what the people were actually like. Oh well…You are either;a) An Arab hater.b) Have a strong and irrational affinity to a country approx. West of Iraq (further west than Jordan)c) A morond) Taking the piss

  • Wombat

    The fact that a group of ideologues wrote about establishing US global hegemony, and even published it on the web, seems to have gone comletely over Ibraham's head. Orang, I think you may be onto something. Be prepared to be initiated into our illuistrious club.

  • Ibrahamav

    That some group wrote it doesn't mean the US government policy is to follow it. In a free country, anyone is allowed to come up with plans for anything.Orang is into nonsense. I'm sure he'll fit in with you.

  • Wombat

    Small group? Ibraham, you are so adept at spotting all manner of anti-Semitic conspiracies, yet so utterly blinkered when it comes to infiramtion hat challenges what little grey matter you allow to consiuder anything else. You sound like Scott McClellan during one of hsi disasterous press conferencesDick Cheney Donald Rumsfeld, and Paul Wolfowitz were part of PNAC, in case you hadn't noticed. Small fry?If you'd bothered to read their document, Rebuilding America's Defences, you'd realise that the US foreign policy is following it to a T.The PNAC claims that the aftermath of he Cold War was a "strategic moment" that should not be squandered. Members of PNAC say that America should use its position to advance its power and interests into all areas of the globe. They believe the time is ripe for establishing democracies in regimes considered hostile to U.S. interests and are not hesitant to advise the use of military means to achieve those ends.

  • leftvegdrunk

    Orang, I'd preface each of these suggestions about Ibrahamav with the word "unemployed" or "insomniac". Where do these heckling fools find the time? Could there be more than one of them, on some kind of roster? Amazing. And very sad.

  • Wombat

    Hey DirtIt might suprise you that we're not all on the same time zone. That probably gives a distorted impression.

  • uphillsprinter

    "not thinking too well", "feeble attempt", it wouldn't hurt to be nice ibrahamav. I guess the Americans are occupying Iraq for the 'coffee beans', oil is sooo Gulf War."…realize what the people were actually like. Oh well."… What are you, Bill O'Reilly!? There is more to the Iraqi resistance than foreign fighters and "pissed sunni's". You have conveniently neglected the Shi'ite resistance. And not all 'evil' Sunni's are associated with Saddam's henchmen.

  • Ibrahamav

    Poor addamo, your antisemitic bent causes you to imagine things not done. Uphill, I'm just going with the flow. Nice is not a requirement. I don't notice the pissed sunni's playing nice.

  • Wombat

    Gee Ibeaham,Maybe it's time you looked up anti-Semitism in the dictionary, and learn what it means.I was talking abotu US foreign policy being manipuated by the ideology of a select few. Surely you are not so stupid as to assume that my mention of 3 people (i.e. only one of whom is Jewish) is an attack on Jews or Israel?But then again, maybe you are indeed that stupid.

  • Edward Mariyani-Squi

    Addamo_01 said… "Gee Ibeaham, Maybe it's time you looked up anti-Semitism in the dictionary, and learn what it means."Addamo_01, after carefully looking over all the past situations where Ibrahamav has used the trope "anti-semitism", I think I have figured out what he means by it:"You are an anti-semite"is always synonymous with"You disagree with me".That seems to be all there is to it.

  • Wombat

    I would add to that Edward, it also means "You disagree with me and I have no argument to refute you".

  • Edward Mariyani-Squi

    Addamo_01, you're right, but on second thoughts I would add to that "You disagree with me, I have no argument to refute you, I'm not even sure what 'an argument' is, and frankly I don't care…..you anti-semite".

  • Ibrahamav

    You would add that because you're an antisemite and as a pre-emptive argument to refute an actual claim of an antisenitic frame of mind?