Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein trav­els across Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea, the United States, Britain, Greece, and Australia to witness the reality of disaster capitalism. He discovers how companies such as G4S, Serco, and Halliburton cash in on or­ganized misery in a hidden world of privatized detention centers, militarized private security, aid profiteering, and destructive mining.

Disaster has become big business. Talking to immigrants stuck in limbo in Britain or visiting immigration centers in America, Loewenstein maps the secret networks formed to help cor­porations bleed what profits they can from economic crisis. He debates with Western contractors in Afghanistan, meets the locals in post-earthquake Haiti, and in Greece finds a country at the mercy of vulture profiteers. In Papua New Guinea, he sees a local commu­nity forced to rebel against predatory resource companies and NGOs.

What emerges through Loewenstein’s re­porting is a dark history of multinational corpo­rations that, with the aid of media and political elites, have grown more powerful than national governments. In the twenty-first century, the vulnerable have become the world’s most valu­able commodity. Disaster Capitalism is published by Verso in 2015 and in paperback in January 2017.

Profits_of_doom_cover_350Vulture capitalism has seen the corporation become more powerful than the state, and yet its work is often done by stealth, supported by political and media elites. The result is privatised wars and outsourced detention centres, mining companies pillaging precious land in developing countries and struggling nations invaded by NGOs and the corporate dollar. Best-selling journalist Antony Loewenstein travels to Afghanistan, Pakistan, Haiti, Papua New Guinea and across Australia to witness the reality of this largely hidden world of privatised detention centres, outsourced aid, destructive resource wars and militarized private security. Who is involved and why? Can it be stopped? What are the alternatives in a globalised world? Profits of Doom, published in 2013 and released in an updated edition in 2014, challenges the fundamentals of our unsustainable way of life and the money-making imperatives driving it. It is released in an updated edition in 2014.
forgodssakecover Four Australian thinkers come together to ask and answer the big questions, such as: What is the nature of the universe? Doesn't religion cause most of the conflict in the world? And Where do we find hope?   We are introduced to different belief systems – Judaism, Christianity, Islam – and to the argument that atheism, like organised religion, has its own compelling logic. And we gain insight into the life events that led each author to their current position.   Jane Caro flirted briefly with spiritual belief, inspired by 19th century literary heroines such as Elizabeth Gaskell and the Bronte sisters. Antony Loewenstein is proudly culturally, yet unconventionally, Jewish. Simon Smart is firmly and resolutely a Christian, but one who has had some of his most profound spiritual moments while surfing. Rachel Woodlock grew up in the alternative embrace of Baha'i belief but became entranced by its older parent religion, Islam.   Provocative, informative and passionately argued, For God's Sakepublished in 2013, encourages us to accept religious differences, but to also challenge more vigorously the beliefs that create discord.  
After Zionism, published in 2012 and 2013 with co-editor Ahmed Moor, brings together some of the world s leading thinkers on the Middle East question to dissect the century-long conflict between Zionism and the Palestinians, and to explore possible forms of a one-state solution. Time has run out for the two-state solution because of the unending and permanent Jewish colonization of Palestinian land. Although deep mistrust exists on both sides of the conflict, growing numbers of Palestinians and Israelis, Jews and Arabs are working together to forge a different, unified future. Progressive and realist ideas are at last gaining a foothold in the discourse, while those influenced by the colonial era have been discredited or abandoned. Whatever the political solution may be, Palestinian and Israeli lives are intertwined, enmeshed, irrevocably. This daring and timely collection includes essays by Omar Barghouti, Jonathan Cook, Joseph Dana, Jeremiah Haber, Jeff Halper, Ghada Karmi, Antony Loewenstein, Saree Makdisi, John Mearsheimer, Ahmed Moor, Ilan Pappe, Sara Roy and Phil Weiss.
The 2008 financial crisis opened the door for a bold, progressive social movement. But despite widespread revulsion at economic inequity and political opportunism, after the crash very little has changed. Has the Left failed? What agenda should progressives pursue? And what alternatives do they dare to imagine? Left Turn, published by Melbourne University Press in 2012 and co-edited with Jeff Sparrow, is aimed at the many Australians disillusioned with the political process. It includes passionate and challenging contributions by a diverse range of writers, thinkers and politicians, from Larissa Berendht and Christos Tsiolkas to Guy Rundle and Lee Rhiannon. These essays offer perspectives largely excluded from the mainstream. They offer possibilities for resistance and for a renewed struggle for change.
The Blogging Revolution, released by Melbourne University Press in 2008, is a colourful and revelatory account of bloggers around the globe why live and write under repressive regimes - many of them risking their lives in doing so. Antony Loewenstein's travels take him to private parties in Iran and Egypt, internet cafes in Saudi Arabia and Damascus, to the homes of Cuban dissidents and into newspaper offices in Beijing, where he discovers the ways in which the internet is threatening the ruld of governments. Through first-hand investigations, he reveals the complicity of Western multinationals in assisting the restriction of information in these countries and how bloggers are leading the charge for change. The blogging revolution is a superb examination about the nature of repression in the twenty-first century and the power of brave individuals to overcome it. It was released in an updated edition in 2011, post the Arab revolutions, and an updated Indian print version in 2011.
The best-selling book on the Israel/Palestine conflict, My Israel Question - on Jewish identity, the Zionist lobby, reporting from Palestine and future Middle East directions - was released by Melbourne University Press in 2006. A new, updated edition was released in 2007 (and reprinted again in 2008). The book was short-listed for the 2007 NSW Premier's Literary Award. Another fully updated, third edition was published in 2009. It was released in all e-book formats in 2011. An updated and translated edition was published in Arabic in 2012.

The “project”

How many Zionists and wannabe Zionists would be happy with this statement?

“…The de-legitimization of the Palestinian narrative becomes a vital prerequisite to any comprehensive resolution of the Palestinian issue”

The “Jerusalem Project” is a radical group dedicated to the “twin dangers facing mankind: totalitarianism of the East, as represented by radical Islam, and moral relativism of the West, aimed at depriving cultures of their spiritual content.” Their “Humanitarian Regional Solution” is clear. The Palestinian “narrative” must be erased from the world and “branded as devoid of any legitimacy.”

Who is involved in this bigotry? Some of the leading political figures in the UK and US, and Daniel Pipes.

If this is Zionism in 2006, it’s little wonder that furious spinning is required to maintain its “legitimacy.”

34 comments ↪
  • Chris

    I would imagine that there are more advocates of Arab Muslim Nationalism happier with this phrase "Oh Muslim, Oh servant of God, there is a Jew hiding behind me. Come here and kill him.", then there are zionists happy with the statement you quoted.

    I dare say that you could probably find just as many leading political figures in Islamic countries who subscribe to the above.

    By the way, exactly what is the 'palestinian narrative" that they were discussing? In their words please, your opinion, or thoughts, or guess at what they were discussing is quite useless when the concern is their fix of the situation.

  • Chris

    Nevermind, I found it myself:

    1. Analysis of their deeds and declarations over the years make it difficult to avoid the conclusion that the Palestinians are in effect both unwilling and incapable of achieving and maintaining statehood.

    (a) Palestinian Unwillingness: This is reflected in the fact that the Palestinians have rejected every single viable proposal which would have afforded them a state – from the 1947 partition plan to the 2000 Barak proposals.

    (b) Palestinian Incapability: The Palestinian national movement has enjoyed conditions far more favorable than almost any other national independence movement since WW-II – widespread international endorsement of their cause, unmitigated support of a superpower in the decades of the Cold War, highly sympathetic coverage by the major media organizations, and over a decade of Israeli administrations who have acknowledged (and at times even identified with) the Palestinians declared national aspirations. In spite of this, the achievements of Palestinian national movement have been more miserable than almost any other national independence movement – bringing nothing but privation and penury to its people.

    2. It is thus far easier to understand Palestinian conduct if one assumes that it is driven less by lack of Palestinian self-determination and more by the very the existence of Jewish self-determination; less by the aspiration to establish a Palestinian state and more by the aspiration to dismantle a Jewish state.

    3. The latter, and seemingly more plausible, explanation of Palestinian behavior – i.e. rejection of Jewish self determination and the dismantling of the Jewish nation state – reflects an agenda totally unacceptable by any international standards and thus must be branded as devoid of any legitimacy.

    4. Accordingly if the accepted version of the Palestinian narrative – i.e. a desire for Palestinian self determination and the aspiration for Palestinian statehood – cannot be reconciled with the history of Palestinian behavior, this narrative also must be branded as devoid of any legitimacy.

    5. This issue of legitimacy of narrative is crucial. Indeed the very fuel of the Political Paradigm, involving the establishment of a Palestinian state, is the perception – or rather the misperception – of the presently prevailing Palestinian narrative as legitimate.

  • Progressive_Atheist

    So, the humanitarian solution is to reject Palestinian self-determination. What a joke!

  • Addamo

    Way to go Chris,

    In the face of a shamelfull expose of israeli diplomacy, look for an example of something doen by the other side as justification. Very constrcutive.

  • Chris

    Merely posting what Antony was referring to. Surely you don't object to Antony's post?

    If so, direct it to him.

  • edward squire

    Progressive_Atheist Mar 17th, 2006 at 1:21 am

    So, the humanitarian solution is to reject Palestinian self-determination. What a joke!

    As a famous pig once put it, "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."

  • Chris

    Are you referring to the fellow to be an animal? Or are you suggesting that his comment is incorrect and that the palestinians had rejected the offer of self determination because they were not receiving 100% of their demands?

  • Stev

    Chris,

    Just what exactly does your imagination or your dares have to do with reality? Or are these terms your new 'seems' and 'appears', terms that are intended to allow you to make ridiculous claims without any need to support them with proof?

    Surely, by definition, self-determination requires that the Palestinians are the ones determining what is a viable solution? Proposals have been rejected, obviously because they are not considered viable. If they were considered viable by both parties then they would be accepted.

  • Chris C

    Chris,

    If I and my powerful buddies came and forcefully kicked you off your land and made myself at home in yours, then over the succeeding years offered you smaller and smaller parcels of "your" land, despite your (increasingly violent) attempts to get "your" property back, would that make you:

    1) Unwilling; or

    2) Incapable;

    of coming to an arrangement?

    And would your demonisation of me over decades be understandable?

    If you think that this is a simplistic analogy of the ME conflict, thats fine, just answer these questions as hypotheticals.

  • edward squire

    Chris Mar 17th, 2006 at 3:47 am

    Are you referring to the fellow to be an animal? Or are you suggesting…

    Read the novel from which the quote is from.

  • orang

    This "Chris" – do you think he gets paid for this, or is he part of the "Hijack all leftist Bloggs with pro-zionist propaganda and general drivel until no-one can stand linking to them" team of slimy cocksuckers – I know Daniel Pipes has got to be one.

  • Antony Loewenstein

    It's fascinating. If an Arab website talked about "erasing the Israeli" narrative, it would be condemned, and rightly so. When Jews/Israelis/Zionist do it, it can be justified.
    And they wonder why there is so much antagonism towards them?

  • Chris C

    Be careful, Ant – before you know it you could be accused of suggesting that Jews bring all their misfortune on themselves!

  • Progressive_Atheist

    … Jews bring all their misfortune on themselves.

    There it is – the myth of the persecuted people.

  • Comical_Ali

    what are you trying to suggest, "Progressive?"

  • Chris

    Antony, first you have to identify that narrative. Your open-ended suggestion leave too much unanswered.

    The group discussed a particular narrative:

    Accordingly if the accepted version of the Palestinian narrative – i.e. a desire for Palestinian self determination and the aspiration for Palestinian statehood – cannot be reconciled with the history of Palestinian behavior, this narrative also must be branded as devoid of any legitimacy.

    I seem to recall Arafat doing his best to erase the Israeli narrative of the Temple being on the Temple Mount.

    Then there is Iran's talk of erasing Israel, period, which seems to bother few here.

  • Addamo

    What specifically is open ended abotu the narrative? You keep making these gradiose statements abotu what is and what sio not legitimate as though it were carbved into some stone by the very finger of god.

    You really do have a delusional sense of regard for your own opinons.

    meanwhile, without a monebt to spare, you spill come garbage about Arafat who in fact actualyl made a declaration to recognise Israel and proved to the world that this is no guarantee against being screwed by Israel.

    Iran may talk about erasing Israel, while Israel talks abotu launchni pre-emtive strikes and nuclear attacks. Who are the extremists here?

  • Chris

    Please give us, or ask Antony to give us, the "Israeli narrative" that he discusses. Without that, his statement regarding such truly has no meaning. It becomes an open ended idea has he has provided no substance.

    Your take on that narrative, while giving us an insight into you, does nothing for the understanding of Antony's statement.

    Spilling garbage about Arafat's statements regarding the Temple Mount? Why do you insist on spilling the beans about your lack of knowledge on the subject?

  • Addamo

    Chris,

    "Why do you insist on spilling the beans about your lack of knowledge on the subject?"

    It hasn't stopped you has it?

    I notice hwo you sidestepped that Arafat did make a declaratino to regcognise Israel and it made no difference. Israel continued to cordon of land and abuse Paelstinian Arabs.

  • Chris

    Nothing has been side-stepped. The issue is your statement about "spill come garbage about Arafat"

    Arafat's statement regarding the subject of concern was made in 2002. Why you insist on informing us of your ignorance is anybody's guess.

  • Comical_Ali

    But what is the Palestinian narrative for self-determination? In his celebetory speech to Gazan fishermen after Israel pulled out of Gaza, Abu Mazen said that "we will not stop until we can fish along the coast of all of Palestine." Fish along the coast of all of Palestine? Considering that Israel just withdrew from all of Gaza & the fct that entire West Bank is land-locked, one would logically think that with gaza they already got the "entire coast of Palestine". So what does he mean? Take a good look at a map.

    Before 1967, the Palestinian "narratvie for self-determination" usually ment a pan-Arabist country called "greater Syria."

    Post-1967, in his first speech to the UN in the 1970's, Arafat declared "Jordan is ours, Palestine is ours." What did he mean?

    Despite, signing the declaration of principals and officially recognising Israel, the PLO charter of building Palestine "from the river to the sea" had not changed.

    Now, in reponse to Israel pulling out of Gaza, the Palestinians overwhelmingly voted in a government which not only in practice refused to recognise Israel (as the PLO did), but officially/theortically too (thus having all its cards laid out on the table).

    So taking all this in to account, there seems to be allot of confusion over the "Palestinian narrative for self determination."

  • Chris

    I don't know that there is confusion regarding the narrative. As stated in the post's reference "a desire for Palestinian self determination and the aspiration for Palestinian statehood" is the narrative under discussion.

    What is confusing is the israli Narrative that Antony referred to.

    I am still waiting for Antony to reveal that narrative of which he speaks.

  • Addamo

    Israel's withdrawal from Gaza was a joke. The IDF continue to excercise contro of the region and while the camera's were fixated on the withdrawl (which the US paid Israel hadnsomely for) settlements expansion in the West Bank were increased.

  • Chris

    Of course. Another made up fact.

    In the meantime, I am still waiting for Antony to reveal the Israel narrative that he spoke of.

  • Addamo

    What made up fact Chris?

    Did Israel or did they not expand West Bank settlements while the Gaza pullout was taking place? Did the Us no finance the pullout by generously compensating the settlers?

    What facts are made up here?

  • Comical_Ali

    such a joke it was that Israel is now a divided country on the brink of civil war. A joke which destroyed farms & green houses which generated over US $250 mill a year for the Israeli economy. A joke which brought Hamas to power (yes, thats how a peace loving people react & respond to concessions & withdrawals) and Al-Qaeda on Israel's door step.

  • Addamo

    "such a joke it was that Israel is now a divided country on the brink of civil war."

    Brink of Civil war? Where? How? Di di miss something?

    "A joke which destroyed farms & green houses which generated over US $250 mill a year for the Israeli economy."

    Yeah and I'm sure bulldozing thousands of Palestinian homes was a boon for their economy, not to mention isolating them from their own orchards and water supplied.

    "yes, thats how a peace loving people react & respond to concessions & withdrawals"

    Consessions and withdrawls? What abotu the land grabs in the West bank of the continued presence of the IDF in the West Bank?

    "Al-Qaeda on Israel’s door step"

    Yeah sure. they are on everyone;s doorstep. That door to door salesman could be one, you nevere know.

  • Comical_Ali

    Brink of Civil war? Where? How? Di di miss something?

    That must have been one long hybernation period.

    Bulldozing thousands of Palestinian homes & isolating them from their orchards? Well I guess you learn new things everyday.

    I guess the "thousands" of homes in question, had nothing to do with homicide bombers & illegal weapons tunnels. And the fact that tens of thousands of Arab homes have been illegally built inside Israel itself without permits means that Israel must be doing a very lousy job at bulldozing…

    What abotu the land grabs in the West bank of the continued presence of the IDF in the West Bank

    ?

    I guess the "land grabs" had nothing to do with rightfully gaining that land in a defensive war. I'm sure the continued IDF presence in the W.Bank, has nothing to do with a little thing called terrorism. Oh no, completley irrelevant. And if Israel withdraws to the pre-67 lines and ends the "occupation," there would be instant peace, rihgt? Well, if the Hamas win to power as a result of the Gaza withdrawal is anything to go by…

    Yeah sure. they are on everyone;s doorstep. That door to door salesman could be one, you nevere know.

    Just ask a door to door called Mahmoud Abbas, he will tell ya

  • Comical_Ali

    I mean – "just ask a door to door salesman called Mahmoud Abbas". Darn typo

  • Addamo

    "I guess the “thousands” of homes in question, had nothing to do with homicide bombers & illegal weapons tunnels."

    Not when those plots of land become the sites for Israeli settlments. It's a bit like a crooked cop stealing from those he chooses to label criminals.

    "I guess the “land grabs” had nothing to do with rightfully gaining that land in a defensive war. "

    Not when the Israelis were warned on illegality of settlements as early as 1967 (http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article12286.htm) and not when such land grabs are prohibited under the 4th Geneva Convention or when Israel is telling the world those terrirotiesa re part of ongoign "negotations".

    "Just ask a door to door called Mahmoud Abbas, he will tell ya"

    Better still, why not ask the Missad
    http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/fakealqaeda.htm
    The Phony (Mossad)
    Al Qaeda Cell in Palestine

    or the UN

    U.N. Report: Jews are Terrorists, Not Palestinians http://www.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2006/3/8/91958

    or Amnety International http://www.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2006/3/8/91958

    Amnesty International's Human Rights Concerns http://www.amnestyusa.org/countries/israel_and_oc

  • Chris

    How many Palestinian homes were plowed under for the purpose of erecting settlements?

    By the way, the UN report headline was quite a joke, it appears that Dugard was assigned to investigate violations by the Israeli side, so he had nothing to say about palestinian terrrorists.

    But that is typical of the information you supply.

  • Addamo

    By the way, the UN report headline was quite a joke, it appears that Dugard was assigned to investigate violations by the Israeli side, so he had nothing to say about palestinian terrrorists.

    And he points out a very good rason for that. He requested help from the israelis and they refuse to co-opertae. Obviosuly they had a lot to hide. Criminals can never be relied on to confes to their crimes.

  • Addamo

    Incidently, you made no mentino of the Amnesty reports. I thought you were a fan of their Chris?

    See no evil, speak no evil right?

  • Chris

    The two reports were identical, no reason to reread propagandic garbage. Especially after the false headline.