Bio

Antony Loewenstein
Photo by Alison Martin

Antony Loewenstein is a Jerusalem-based, independent, freelance, investigative journalist, author and film-maker. He has written for the The Guardian, New York Times, Washington Post, New Statesman, Al Jazeera, The New York Review of Books, Huffington Post, Salon, The Daily Star, Le Monde Diplomatique English, Foreign Policy, The National, The Independent, Electronic Intifada, Al Akhbar English, Dawn, Haaretz, The Nation, New Internationalist, Forward, Sydney Morning Herald, The Australian, Los Angeles Review of Books, BBC World Service, Adbusters, Al Masry Alyoum, Juan Cole, Mondoweiss, Tehelka, +972 Magazine, TRT World, Open Democracy, Sydney’s Sun-Herald, New Zealand Herald, Sydney Ideas Quarterly, The Australian Financial Review, Crikey, Melbourne’s Age, Brisbane’s Courier Mail, Canberra Times, Online Opinion, New Matilda, The Conversation, ABC Unleashed/The Drum, Amnesty International Australia, Green Left Weekly, Eureka Street, Kill Your Darlings, Tikkun, Adelaide’s Advertiser, The Bulletin, Znet, Overland, Sydney PEN, The Big Issue, Counterpunch and many others.

He’s been a weekly columnist for The Guardian.

Antony contributed a major chapter to 2004’s Australian best-seller, Not Happy, John! on the Middle East.

His best-selling book on the Israel/Palestine conflict, My Israel Question, was released by Melbourne University Publishing in 2006. A new, updated edition was released in 2007 (and reprinted again in 2008). The book was short-listed for the 2007 New South Wales Premier’s Literary Award. Another fully updated, third edition was published in 2009. It was released in all e-book formats in 2011. An updated and translated edition was published in Arabic in 2012.

He was a contributor to the 2008 Verso Books release, A Time to Speak Out: On Israel, Zionism and Jewish Identity.

His second book, The Blogging Revolution, on the internet in repressive regimes, was released in 2008 by Melbourne University Publishing, an updated edition in 2011, post the Arab revolutions, and an updated Indian print version in 2011.

His 2010 ABC Radio National feature documentary, A Different Kind of Jew, was a finalist in the UN Media Peace Awards.

He is a contributor to the 2011 book My Favourite Teacher, published by NewSouth. He has a chapter in the 2011 book, On Utøya: Anders Breivik, right terror, racism and Europe, on the nexus between Israel and the Right.

He’s the co-editor, with Ahmed Moor, of After Zionism in 2012. A collection of the world’s leading writers and thinkers on the Israel/Palestine conflict, the book outlines how the one-state solution can be achieved in the Middle East. He appeared at London’s Frontline Club to discuss it.

He is the co-editor, with Jeff Sparrow, of Left Turn in 2012. Featuring some of Australia’s leading progressive voices, the collection provides an alternative view on #Occupy, unions, Palestine, the media, war, climate change and other vital issues.

He is a contributor to the 2012 collection, Loving This Planet, edited by Helen Calcidott and published by The New Press, on the importance of Wikileaks.

He’s co-author of the 2013 book For God’s Sake, via Pan Macmillan, on the role of religion, faith and politics in society.

He released in 2013 the best-selling book Profits of Doom, released in an updated edition in 2014, including a photography exhibition, about vulture capitalism and privatisation in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Haiti, Australia, the Asia-Pacific, the “war on terror” and beyond.

In 2015 he released a major new book, Disaster Capitalism: Making A Killing Out Of Catastrophe, out with Verso Books. It was out in paperback in January 2017. It’s currently being translated into Turkish and Arabic.

He wrote/co-produced a documentary with New York based film-maker Thor Neureiter, Disaster Capitalism, about aid, development and politics in Afghanistan, Haiti and Papua New Guinea. It was selected for the prestigious 2016 Hot Docs film festival. It was released in 2018, screening across the globe.

His book on the global “war on drugs”, Pills, Powder and Smoke: Inside the Bloody War on Drugs, featuring on the ground reporting from Honduras, Guinea-Bissau, the Philippines, the US, UK and Australia, was out in 2019 in Australia, the US and India and 2020 in the UK.

He made a 2019 documentary for Al Jazeera English on abuse of the opioid drug tramadol in Nigeria and Africa, West Africa’s Opioid Crisis, with South African film-maker Naashon Zalk.

He appears in the acclaimed 2019 documentary, This Is Not A Movie, on the famous Middle East correspondent, Robert Fisk.

He’s the winner of the 2019 Jerusalem (Al Quds) Peace Prize, one of Australia’s leading peace awards.

He’s represented by literary agent Zeitgeist Agency.

He was a Research Associate at the University of Technology Sydney’s Australian Centre for Independent Journalism and is a current Global Associate at Sydney University’s Sydney Democracy Network. In 2016, he was a Visiting Researcher in the Global Governance Research Unit at WZB, Berlin’s Social Science Centre. In 2016, Antony was a finalist in the US-based, Kurt Schork Memorial Fund Awards in International Journalism.

He sits on the advisory council of the British-based Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice. He is the co-founder of advocacy group Independent Australian Jewish Voices and contributed to Amnesty International Australia’s 2008 campaign about Chinese internet repression and the Beijing Olympic Games.

Antony appears regularly around the world on radio (including the BBC), TV (including Al Jazeera English, Democracy Now! and ABC News24), in public, writer’s festivals (in Australia such as Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and every major literary festival in the country and overseas such as Indonesia, India, South Africa and New Zealand) and at universities (including Harvard) discussing current affairs, politics and media.

Email: [email protected]